FORMULA 1 CHINESE GRAND PRIX

Posted By F1 Fast Lap











Shanghai

Race Date:
20 Apr 2014
Circuit Name:
Shanghai International Circuit
First Grand Prix:
2004
Number of Laps:
56
Circuit Length:
5.451 km
Race Distance:
305.066 km
Lap Record:
1:32.238 - M Schumacher (2004)

The Shanghai International Circuit was designed as the race circuit for the new millennium. And the modern track, with its stunning architecture, has achieved its goal of becoming China's gateway to the world of Formula One racing since it debuted on the calendar in 2004.

Circuit architects Hermann Tilke and Peter Wahl on their creation: “The 5.4 kilometre racing track is shaped like the Chinese character 'shang', which stands for 'high' or 'above'. Other symbols represented in the architecture originate from Chinese history, such as the team buildings arranged like pavilions in a lake to resemble the ancient Yuyan-Garden in Shanghai. 
Here, nature and technology are carefully used to create harmony between the elements.”

Not only is the course remarkable for its change of acceleration and deceleration within different winding turns, making high demands on the driver as well as the car, but also for its high-speed straights. These offer crucial overtaking opportunities and give an intense and exciting motorsport experience to the spectators. The main grandstand with 29,000 seats provides a spectacular view of almost 80 percent of the circuit.

Turns 1 and 2 make up a very long right-hand curve which leads immediately into turns 3 and 4, a very long left-hand curve. One and two are far more difficult - a lift on entry followed by various taps of the throttle and brakes are needed so the car maintains balance throughout. It also becomes blind towards the middle of the corner. Three and four are nowhere near as difficult but a good exit is needed to gain speed down the following straight and through turn 5. Turn 6 is a second gear, right-handed hairpin with plentiful run-off. Turns 7 and 8 make up a high speed chicane - the left-right complex sees a constant G-force of 3 and a minimum speed of about 100 mph. Turns 9 and 10 immediately follow - two slow left-handers which require a good exit to gain speed down the next straight. Turns 11 and 12 effectively make up a slow left-right chicane where the use of kerbs are important but traction is low. Turn 13 is a very long right-hander which becomes less and less tight, and a very good exit is important as the longest straight in F1 follows. It is the equivalent to 11 football pitches laid end to end, or the same length as three and a half of the world's biggest aircraft carriers. Turn 14 is a hairpin at the end of the straight - the second gear corner is a prime overtaking spot as DRS is available in the run up to the corner. Turn 16 is the last corner - a fourth-gear left-hander which requires a quick tap on the brakes - braking early can be more effective as you can then carry more speed through the corner and then down the pit straight.

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